About Us | Contact Us
View Cart

Change Management and the Facebook Development Team

By Dan Hadaway | Saturday, September 24, 2011 - Leave a Comment

If you, like me, have been “sucked in” to the Facebook craze, you’ve also recently been reading a LOT of posts about the new Facebook interface.  Even the tag clouds on Google and Twitter show Facebook complaints as a leading conversation trend.

In fact, I chimed in on the conversation with this post:

“You’re not really ‘there’ until everybody hates you and makes jokes about you. Congratulations Facebook, you’ve joined the ranks of Google, Microsoft, and IBM.”

In perfect new-media form, I’m going to share a secret now with everybody in the world.  (Yes, because I’m a Facebook-er, I too have been numbed to the normal trepidations of sharing secrets about myself in public.)  So here goes . . . .

I’m sorry, but I happen to like the new Facebook interface.  I think it’s more convenient, allows more control over your news feed, gives you the ability to classify posts, and allows you to see real-time commenting more effectively.

Yet, with all the effort Facebook must have put into designing this new interface, they are taking a MAJOR reputational hit.

So being the opportunist that I am, I must take this opportunity to point out that the PRIMARY causes of Facebook’s new release depression is indeed what we in IT Governance like to refer to as “Change Management.”

I know, this is not a very happy subject for many smaller institutions, because to comply with “best practices” you would have to do so much work you’d never be able to accomplish change.  But the Facebook incident proves something.  And yes, this would indeed be classified as an Information Security Incident if Facebook had adopted some of the incident response policies I’ve been auditing these days.  And the post-mortem analysis of this incident would surely lead even the smallest of Incident Response Teams to conclude that there are some simple change management fundamentals that even small businesses should consider:

1)      People don’t like change, no matter how good it is for them.

2)      Announce the darn change, preferably IN ADVANCE of the change.

3)      Heck, try to SELL the change in advance if you can.

4)      Try to give people an opportunity, if possible, to opt out of the change, at least at first.  If appropriate, establish a timeline for adopting the change.

5)      Another way to put item 4:  Get approval for the change in advance of making the change.  (And yes, at least in banks, sometimes that approval process is going to require a risk assessment.)

6)     If you really want to get fancy, try to include some instructions explaining the change, how to use the new features, and perhaps some suggestions on how to make the most of the change.

7)     Finally, if the change involves your customers and you have a social media presence (ahem Facebook), monitor the social media comments about the change, and try to respond to them.

And that’s why Facebook should be treating this as an Information Security Incident.  Had an Incident Response Team been called once they realized their boneheaded-ness, maybe an opt-out button could have been offered.  Then early adopters would eventually bring the late adopters into the mix.

——————————————-——————————————————————–————————-

Dan Hadaway CRISC, CISA, CISM
Founder and President, Infotex

——————————————-——————————————————————–————————-

“Dan’s New Leaf” is a “fun blog to inspire thought in the area of IT Governance.”


 

 

Latest News
    Another awareness poster for YOUR customers (and users).  Now that we have our own employees aware, maybe it’s time to start posting content for our customers! Download the large versions here: Awareness Poster (Portrait) Awareness Poster (Landscape)   You are welcome to print out and distribute this around your office.  
    Intelligence agencies from five nations contributed to the new advisory… An article review. For the first time, the cybersecurity divisions of the nations in the “Five Eyes” alliance (The United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and New Zealand) have released a joint advisory concerning incident response. The report, available here, does not provide a complete […]
    PRESS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE BUSINESS NEWS NEW EMPLOYEE FOR INFOTEX infotex has just hired Nathan Harrell, to be a new Engagement Coordinator to assist with all communications between both current and prospective Clients. “We’re really excited to have Nate joining the team to help us keep the channels of communication open!” says Bryan […]
    A Webinar-Movie Short Back by popular demand! Our Board Awareness Training program continues with this movie, entitled Vulnerability Management for Directors, that can be presented directly to your board of directors.
    Nearly half of all companies expect a security issue due to telecommuting… An article review. A few months ago we discussed a warning from the Department of Homeland Security regarding hackers taking advantage of the business disruptions caused by COVID-19, and according to an article shared with us by our friend Wes Pollard it appears […]